Web Annotation With Hypothes.is In Canvas Training Session

This post is being used to document and distribute materials associated with a training I'm giving at the University of Oklahoma, which covers collaborative web annotation as a tool for engaging students.

“Writing in the margins” of books and journal articles (or any other texts) in collaboration with others is one way instructors seek to enhance learning experiences. Using collaborative web annotations, faculty on our campus are seeding their course discussions and engaging students in collaborative scholarship. Here’s an example of course that is using collaborative web annotations:

Website using hypothes.is to annotate Byron Readings

Tool Showcase

We’re going to dive deeper into collaborative web annotation as it’s one technology that’s being used across many disciplines. Here are several pieces of literature that are being annotated collaboratively by students:

If you’d like to create a Hypothes.is account and start collaboratively annotating the web, signup here.

Here’s a student blog post you can practice annotating now.

Additionally, here is what Hypothes.is looks like integrated into Canvas:

Canvas Course displaying hypothes.is content.

Discussion

  1. Why use collaborative web annotation in the classroom?
  2. What documents might be annotated by students?
  3. What does an assignment look like using web annotation? (Current ones)
  4. What other assignments could benefit from web annotation?
  5. How does feedback to student change with web annotation assignments?
  6. Why engage students in annotating materials publicly?
  7. Any other thoughts/ideas?

Resources

Perspective

Instructor Blog Post: Using Hypothes.is in the College Classroom

Technical

(Technical resources from here.)

The featured image is provided CC0 by Anastasia Zhenina via Unsplash.

Teaching in Higher Ed Podcast

Recently I had the honor of participating in the Teaching in Higher Ed Podcast hosted by Bonni Stachowiak. My half-hour session with Bonni focused on games in higher education. Specifically, I spoke about GOBLIN, eXperience Play, and my use of games in faculty development at the University of Oklahoma. For more details, listen to the podcast episode here:

After listening, I’d recommend checking out the show notes for the podcast session:

Game-based Learning

My time with Bonni was a blast and podcasting was among the highlights of my week! In fact, the Teaching in Higher Ed Podcast will remain a memorable part of this semester and I will always recall and appreciate how Bonni helped me feel comfortable participating in my first podcast. Thank you Bonni!

If you’re not already, I highly recommend subscribing to the Teaching in Higher Ed Podcast. There are many great episodes exploring the work of phenomenal educators from around the world! Listen to some of my favorite episodes:

Episode #18 – AUDREY WATTERS: How technology is changing higher education


Episode #91 – BONNI STACHOWIAK: Choose your own adventure assessment


Episode #108 – MAHA BALI: Collaboration


Episode #118 – MICHAEL WESCH: Teacher Becomes Student Through LIFE101

The featured image is provided CC0 by Kai Oberhäuser via Unsplash.